ISGS in the News

ADM touts latest carbon capture well

Archer Daniels Midland Co. publicly unveiled its system to pump carbon dioxide emissions deep underground on Sept. 22, an initiative to lessen the carbon emissions of the company.

 

A map for Illinois homeowners worried about mine subsidence

St. Louis metro-east homeowners can use an interactive map by the Illinois State Geological Survey to see if there's a coal mine under their property.

Earthquake in Ottawa? Seismic activity says no

Facebook conversations circulated among Ottawa residents ... Thursday ... many speculating it felt like an earthquake. Tim Larson of the Illinois State Geological Survey said seismometers showed no activity.

ILMINES: Are you living on a coal mine?

Thousands of Illinois homes could be near a coal mine. Some 201,000 acres of urban and built-up lands may be near underground mines, according to an ISGS study: Coal Mines in Illinois.

Philippines earthquake kills 2, injures 100

The Illinois State Geological Survey demonstrates how earthquakes can 'liquefy' soil and wreak havoc on buildings and infrastructure.

Lake Michigan shoreline erosion could be getting worse, research shows

From 1939 to 2014, the northern shoreline along Illinois Beach State Park has retreated more than 600 feet, -- an average of 8 feet per year, says coastal geologist Ethan Theuerkauf.

The quest to capture and store carbon – and slow climate change — just reached a new milestone

A new large-scale technology has launched in Decatur that could result in the active removal of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

ADM Begins Operations for Second Carbon Capture and Storage Project

ISGS continues as a scientific partner as Archer Daniels Midland Company begins a second major carbon capture and storage (CCS) project.

U.S. scientists gauge coastal erosion along Lake Michigan

The year 2016 was the warmest on record. The U.S. state of Illinois is trying to measure its impact on the shores of Lake Michigan.

Source: Aljazeera


Researchers ponder whether low ice coverage is the Great Lakes' new normal

Two years ago the polar vortex set the Upper Midwest into a deep freeze. But two mild winters and retreating lake levels are giving researchers pause.

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